Posts

Flowing Stones Origami Tessellation

Image
 This is an idea I had a while back, but it felt a little simple. Because of the weather (humid = soft paper), I decided to just go ahead and bang it out and finally see how it would look finished.  It was a pretty easy fold. Nothing tricky about it.  It's a 3D fold. It does not flatten.  Crease pattern is super easy. Just that odd shape with triangles poking at the cross grid folds.  These kinds of ideas are prefect for weak paper and humid days. They really respond well to those circumstances.  But I'm eager for autumn and some crisp, dry days where complex folds are again feasible. I'd much rather fold something difficult, even if it's someone else's idea. 

Figured Out, But Haven't Quite Folded

Image
So I found this pic I had saved a while back that really piqued my interest. It was folded by Origami Yonca and designed by Aresniy K. Those two really keep me busy with the origami solving.  It wasn't too difficult to figure out the creases, however, actually folding it was a very different experience.  First attempt was a fail. I used sturdy paper, but it was too humid. The paper went limp. Second attempt, I used barely okay paper, but I'm nearly there. Still working on some of the finer details.  I think size really is an issue. I'm using printer paper. So the folds tend to be very small.  I'm pretty sure if I went back to thick paper on a dry day it would turn out really nice. Just not sure that I want to make a third attempt. I'm pretty sure I can complete the second, even if it might have a few flaws.  I did sort of complete the second attempt. It's somewhat flawed. However, I realized that I had folded it on paper that for reasons I can't really discl

Kissing Stones Origami Tessellation

Image
Something a little less intense. Double size hexagons with triangles off the points.  Blunt pyramids off of the triangles.  It's not wildly difficult or immensely intricate, but it was a fun little exercise.  It's a flat fold on a 32 pleat triangle grid.  Done on an ordinary 8.5 x 11 inch sheet of copy paper trimmed to a hexagon. .  You don't have to trim out the paper to a hexagon. It can be done just the same on the rectangle. I just find it's easier to reach the center with my stubby little fingers.  Other than the initial hexagon, No cuts. No buts. No coconuts. 

Framing It Origami Tessellation

Image
I had come up with the crease pattern for a really cool tessellation that I'd saved to my google photos. It's quite intricate. The figuring part was actually easier than I expected. The folding part was a little more intense. I got to a point where I just had to take a step back. It was partially coalescing, but not quite.  It has a lot of fiddly little folds that need to happen for it to work. And I was just kind of over it.  I was glad to have figured it out from the picture of the model, but not really sure if I could actually fold it with the size of paper I was using. It was set aside for another day. Though, it still felt like a win, since I did have the mechanics all worked out on paper.  Moving on, taking a break from the hard stuff, I came up with something simpler just off the top of my head. An easy one was a welcome distraction.  It's pretty basic, but an interesting pattern still.  I forgot to take a pic of the crease pattern. Will upload it at a later date.

Bridged Triangle Vortexes Tessellation

Image
 The classic six triangles twisted around a small hexagon on the reverse is a cornerstone of tessellating paper. In this case, I just added a little rectangle and then repeated the six triangle module. Some blunt cornered triangles form in the negative space.  Whenever I fold this type of tessellation I'm always reminded of Robin Scholz's videos where he effortlessly folds the same type of configuration piece by piece.  The paper always seems to behave exactly as he wants.  As much as I try to do it that way, it never works. I always end up with a completed center that starts to come undone as I work outward. I wind up partially folding the rest and then pushing it altogether as a whole. .  Nevertheless, regardless of the method, I'm still pretty pleased with the end result. 

Solving Arseniy K's Crows Having Fun Origami Tessellation

Image
 Still deep into my fascination with Arseniy K's tessellations, I set about reconstructing his "Crows Having Fun" model.  A few  false starts later, it coalesced for me and I had the crease pattern ready to fold.  It was a nice fold. It wasn't too hard. It wasn't too easy. It was just right. It fits perfectly on a 32 pleat triangle grid.  Those odd little beak shapes circle around large hexagons. Triangles negotiate the spaces where their edges meet.  The negative space triangles on the front are blunt cornered triangles on the reverse.  It was actually knowing what shape would create the negative triangles on the front that led me to the solution. I started from there and worked outward on grid paper It's a wonderful and unique design.   Crease pattern included below. 

Chain-link Origami Tessellation

Image
Was working on figuring out another design on Arseniy K's instagram when I stumbled upon this alternative crease pattern. I knew it was not the answer to the puzzle I was trying to solve, but I liked it. So I forged ahead with it.  It turned out quite nice.  Slightly tricky to fold. Very crowded on the reverse side. Lots of overlaps.  I did later hit upon the structure for his actual model and have since folded that as well. It will be my next post.  It's neat though, how the process of figuring out another fold led me to this unique variation.  Crease pattern is included below. 

Stepping Stones Tessellation

Image
  I'm a big fan of Arseniy K's origami tessellations. I often check out his stuff for both reverse engineer challenges and inspirations for new designs.  I was poking around on his instagram and really liked a piece that featured a trio of nested small triangles. He titled it "Crushed Ice for Cocktails".  Figuring out the pattern wasn't too bad. However, when I went to fold it, all I achieved was a really limp, sad piece of paper that was never going to do what I had intended.  It's a very dense and complicated crease pattern which I may attempt again sometime with sturdier paper.  But since I already had the structure figured out, I decided to modify it a bit to make it a somewhat less intense undertaking.  This tessellation is the result of that.  It's a three dimensional fold.  I thought about literally doubling everything for a flat fold, but I opted against it since it would have so little repeat on a 32 division grid. Side note: I really need to acqu

Pieces of the Pie Origami Tessellation

Image
  So I recently stumbled upon a shape that was new to me. My Wagon Wheels Tessellation post reflected the first time I folded it. This idea for this tessellation quickly followed.  I was simply looking to modify the original idea to find a flat fold version. Large hexagons with the chamfered rectangle off of them. Large triangles in the negative spaces.  I had to do this odd little bisector fold where the points of the triangles met with the the axes of the hexagons. I've used the technique before on a few occasions.  It feels a little like cheating, but not really. All's fair in love, war and origami.  Crease pattern is next. . 

Trapezoid Flagstone Reverse Engineer

Image
 The origami tessellations group at flickr is a great source of ideas, inspiration and learning. I went there the other day in search of all three.  I saw this really nice flagstone that had just recently been posted. It was folded by 'Origami Yonca' and designed by Arseniy K.  It's trapezoids repeating outwardly from a central circular pattern. It very much reminded me of Joel Cooper's "Just Rhombii", only with trapezoids in place of all the rhombuses.  There was no crease pattern posted, so I set about mapping it out in order to fold it myself.  Having folded Cooper's "Just Rhombii" in the past (with the help of his crease pattern), I didn't have much trouble determining the crease pattern for this one.  It's a really beautiful design that I would never come up with on my own. But it was very satisfying to determine the architecture and use that to recreate it.  I thought it was especially cool how he finished the edges.  My crease patt

Wagon Wheels Origami Tessellation

Image
 So I stumbled upon this shape I'd not seen before. I'm pretty confident all the shapes have long since been found,  but it was inspiring to find something I'd not personally encountered elsewhere.  I found it while searching for a new shape that would be compatible with triangles that are folded in on themselves.  It's a 3-D fold.  The photo doesn't really capture the triangles well, but you can sort of see them there in the negative spaces like faded ghosts. They're much more visible in the back side photo that's next.  This idea/fold set me off on another tessellation. A similar assortment of shapes that instead fold flat. That'll be my next post.  I do have a crease pattern. For those that want it. 

Cannibal Rhombuses

Image
 When I concocted this tessellation I was sure I'd never done it before. I assumed others had done it, but that I'd not yet encountered this particular configuration.  Turns out that I had done it before.  It's deceptive. The crease pattern seems so simple. Like it will be a nice, relaxing fold.  It was infuriatingly difficult. I was on the verge of giving up several times. On top of that, a heat wave and humidity making what's normally very sturdy paper limp and lifeless.  So although I've done this one and posted it before as " Hungry Rhombuse s", it's worth taking a second look at it.  Pro tip: put your paper in the freezer to dry it out. It really works. 

12 sides are better than 6

Image
 Dodecagons offer a different shape that tessellates in a flagstone style with triangles and rhombuses. It's not really all that different from an architectural perspective from hexagons. But it does create different silhouettes..  This is dodecagons connected by rhombuses.  Nothing mysterious here. Just two classic shapes playing nicely together.  Fits pretty well on a 32 pleat triangle grid. 

Whirling Dervishes Origami Tessellation

Image
  So I found this tessellation on some site where they were trying to sell it. It had a pretty steep price tag, so I just figured it was a complicated design.  I messed around with various possible ways it might be constructed and didn't crack it.  Decided I was overthinking it and abandoned it.    A couple weeks later, I wasn't thinking about it at all, but suddenly realized how to do it. It was much simpler than I had originally thought.  It felt good to hit upon the solution, even if it was a pretty basic one.  I had wasted a lot of time thinking it was some mysterious trickery of folds, when all along it was actually incredibly basic.  Go figure.  To its credit, it doesn't photograph as basic. It really provides a fetching image.  When I finally came up with the crease pattern, I just did a big face palm at how I'd completely overlooked the obvious answer.  It was fairly easy to fold. I used kraft paper.  It gets a little tricky at times because everything is codepe

It's All About Perspective

Image
There's a funny story behind this tessellation.  Years ago I took some photos of the crease patterns in Eric Gjerde's Awe-Inspiring Tessellations book.  I saved them to a private (not publically accessible) google photos album and there they sat for years gathering virtual dust.  But when I found myself with origami  writer's block I decided to revisit them.  Except, I didn't include any pictures of what the finished model should look like or any titles which might hint at it.  So when I went to fold the crease pattern that resulted in this, I had no idea it was actually supposed to become his "Five and Four".  I quickly sketched the main lines onto my paper and paid no attention to valley and mountain folds. When I set about collapsing, I just chose different shapes to be dominant and wound up with what you see here.  So same exact lines and creases just folded in a slightly different way and you wind up with something  else entirely. Kind of neat when you th

From the Beginning

Image
This tessellation is straight from Eric Gjerde's book 'Origami Tessellations: Awe-Inspiring Geometric Designs'. I don't recall the title of the design. I just have a memory of how much I loved how it backlit. . I folded it years ago, but had never posted it here.  So feeling both nostalgic and lacking for any new ideas, I decided to fold it again.  I actually first learned the fundamental principles of origami tessellations from that book. It set me off on a path where I just kept digging deeper and deeper into more and more complex folds. I'm still obsessed with the craft and always learning. So thanks Eric.  All these years later, what once seemed such a difficult concept to wrap my head around, now feels elementary. I banged it out in only minutes once I'd completed the grid.  Nevertheless, It still backlights beautifully. Another great example of how the simpler designs produce some of the most wonderful results.

Rolling Stones Tess

Image
Just riffing on " Joel Cooper's Sunflower Tessellation " that I folded not too long ago. Playing around with other possible combinations of shapes.  When I mapped this one out it was clear it would not fold flat. But I liked the idea enough that I was ready to try to do another 3D fold for a change. Was hoping it would generate a cool design when backlit. This is subjective, of course. But here are the results.  So it's a classic circle of triangles with a small hex twist on the reverse side.  Then where the sunflower tessellation employed rhombuses off of that, I wanted to do open back hex twists.  Because the design doesn't flatten the backlit images show odd shapes that don't match up with the what you would expect to see.   My crease pattern drawing is included below. 

Supernova Tessellation

Image
  This is an odd variation on triangle twists around a small hexagon. I folded the triangles in on themselves. Folded them in half. Once two such were done this created the point connecting them. Tucked a hexagon backward off that point to be able to flatten it. I hate reverse rabbit ear folds. I avoid them whenever possible.  The whole affair is a bit of tight fit. They're not normal hexagon twists. Several of the axes have to bang into each other with one tucked below the other. Still, it does work without much fuss.  The paper got a bit curled up on itself during the thick of it, but nothing a careful eye can't handle.  I would've repeated the central design, but my grid was much to small for that. Only a single star point repeated. So I just adjusted it to what I thought made a nice looking finished edge..  Rather less complicated than my usual fare. A nice change of pace.  I do have a crude crease pattern. It's included below. 

Hello and Goodbye Origami Tessellation

Image
 My previous square grid triangles tessellation gave me an idea for another. It's not that different. It seemed way cooler in my head. I wanted them pointing at each other as well as going in opposite directions. Same basic principles. Just reverse a few things. I thought about leaving no gap between the flat sides and decided against it. But maybe that would've been more interesting.  Honestly, I didn't want to do all the extra folding that would've been involved. 

Triangles North and South

Image
 Decided to do some square grid tessellation work. Just to keep up my understanding of it. Thought triangles might be interesting. I've casually wanted to do something with triangles on the square grid for a while now.  Used what I learned from this tessellation as a jumping off point since the triangles are really just half diamonds and the flat side is the same as a single side of a square.  It came together rather uneventfully.  It needs a lot of small diagonal folds in both directions. A little bit tedious in the prep work.  The actual collapse is pretty simple. However, it does overlap some on the backside. As you get closer to finishing the collapse you'll need to tuck certain folds under others. The specifics  will become apparent as you approach completion.  I do have a rough crease pattern that I haven't yet photographed. Will add it at a later date.  Update: Adding crease pattern....