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Percussion Origami Tessellation

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  This is an idea I had for a odd shape I haven't really seen done.  It's not a twist tessellation. It's a collapse style tess.  Not too complicated. Not too simple.  It's a 32 pleat triangle grid. I used 24 lb bond paper.  Repeating the design resulted in standard hexagons in addition to the odd shapes.  It was a relatively simple fold.  Some of the folds are a little fidgety, but all in all, it's pretty tame.  Many of the folds are unnervingly misaligned/strayed from the grid, but they still make sense when you get down into it.  When I came up with the concept I was hoping for something a little more dramatic, but overall, I'm pleased with the end result.  How to fold it is probably pretty obvious. No secrets lurking in these backlit images.  Still I do have a crude crease patter just to be thorough.  

Star of David Flagstone Tessellation by Robin Scholz

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  Folded a Robin Scholz flagstone tessellation he named 'Star of David'. I was surprised to find a pattern of his I had not already executed.  I used standard 20 lb copy paper. It worked out surprisingly well. It's dead of winter here. So the paper does as I command without complaint.  It's a wonderful pattern.  What I love most about flagstone tessellations is that they're so logical.  Most, if not all, origami tessellations are logical, but flagstones are moreso somehow.  Everything works together in a neat little package.  If you're interested in folding flagstone tessellations the most helpful advice I can give is to work both sides of the paper.  The reverse side of a flagstone tessellation is almost more important than the front. 

Bells and Triangles Flagstone Origami Tesseelation Version 2.0

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 This is an idea I had back in September 2019. I folded it then, but upon revisiting decided it warranted a new attempt.  The first time I used ordinary paper. It came out okay.  This time around I opted for kraft paper. This stuff is like folding thin cardboard.  It does not backlight well. But I still like the finished product.  Still working on neatening up the reverse side.  Update: adding a crease pattern photo. It's probably not necessary for most folders, but if you want it, it's here. 

Second Chances Origami Tessellation

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 I was going through old models and set aside a few that I felt were interesting, but that I had not executed properly the first time around.  This is one of those.  It's small hexagon twists and triangle twists that are between one pleat and two. The hexagons and the triangles live on  opposite sides of the paper. There is a need (if flatness is to be achieved) to twist the edges adjacent to the triangle points a little further. This is how the resultant arms off of the hexes are achieved.  It's a very tight fit. It folds easiest when the hex side is worked more.  The end result is pretty interesting. 

Chasing the Folds

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This is another tessellation by Arseniy K that I fussed over until I had it figured out at last. Once I'd discovered the crease pattern, I realized it was going to be pretty tricky. It's small and compact. Still, I pressed onward, in spite of my doubt.  It took a while to fold. The paper I was using was not thrilled about what I was trying to do to it.  Eventually, it acquiesced to my stubbornness and I had success. I found it very helpful to work mostly on  the reverse side. I was never confident I would actually complete the fold, but I had nothing else to do other than try. I continued on despite my ambivalence and it did come to fruition.  That's the thing about tricky folds... they simultaneously inspire and intimidate me.  It's an interesting experience to see the paper go from a floppy mess of grid and pre-creases to over time finally surrendering to these mad configurations.   It's almost an addiction. Or maybe it literally is.  I do have a crease pattern, b

Corners of My Mind Origami Tessellation

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  Not sure how I came up with this one. It's an odd idea I had. It's pretty basic. Square grid tessellations always feel easier to me. They probably literally are easier. Four edges vs. the six edges of a hexagonal design is a little less complex.  The triangle grid, hex design is definitely my preference. I thrive on the difficulty.  Still, I like to occasionally go back to the square grid. It just feels like something I should remain acquainted with working. Have to keep those skills sharp.  My first ever major tessellation success was the high density clover tess. It cemented my love of the genre and set me off on the path to exploring all the other  possible complexities.  No matter how you prefer to fold or how long you've been doing it, there's always more to enjoy and learn. 

Crowding Triangles Origami Tessellation

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As I was figuring a design by someone else, I accidentally landed on this idea.  It's kind of  cool in a simple sort of way.  I wanted to squash fold the flaps, but it's not an easy task with a small model. They don't always behave as we would want.  I actually did do the squash folds on the center, but that's as far as I got. No picture of that yet.  At any rate, it's an interesting little idea. Not the most complex or challenging, but worth a go nonetheless. 

A Wild Weave Origami Tessellation by Arseniy K

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Worked out another Arseniy K origami creation that I managed to decipher and execute. It wasn't too hard since he had uploaded both a front and back photo to his instagram. Knowing what the reverse side should look like makes it so much easier.  It's kind of a close knit fold, so I was apprehensive I would have trouble with the actual folding of it.  But it's been cold and dry here lately, so the paper was pretty resilient.  All in all, it worked out pretty easily. Relatively speaking.  He didn't post backlit photos, but I think it backlights really beautifully. That's my opinion anyway.  I don't know how he consistently comes up with so many original ideas. It's very impressive.  Another pic and, spoiler alert, a crease pattern follow.  If you want to figure it out on your own without any hints, don't scroll too far down. 

Merry Go Rounds Origami Tessellation

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  I kinda came up with this design by accident. Not really sure how I arrived at this configuration. The paper sort of led me more than me leading it. I'm still wondering which is the front and which is the back of this tessellation. I guess it's just a matter of individual perspective.  It's a somewhat congested arrangement, but it definitely works as a flat fold.  It's based off of open back hex twists that have some teardrop shapes radiating from them.  For the repeat they transition into offset pyramidal shapes.  There's also a crease pattern at the bottom for those that want it. It seemed really interesting as I was coming up with it. Make of that what you will. 

Success At Last

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 This is an update to my post from September about a really interesting tessellation that I struggled to execute properly.  The fold was by OrigamiYonca. The design was by Arseniy K.  While the mechanics of it came rather easily, the folding of it escaped me.  My first attempt with printer paper failed. My second attempt was moderately successful, but I realized I couldn't upload a pic because of what was printed on the paper and an NDA.  I tried again with different paper and no joy.  Switched back to regular paper and easily folded a single module version.  Still, I felt I had to complete the more challenging fold.  I used larger paper. Almost twice the size. Sadly, the paper was not as sturdy as I had hoped.  The tessellation was finally completed, but it was rough, to say the least.  I learned that I do not enjoy using large paper for tessellations. My hands and fingers are simply too small for the task.  Nevertheless, I  felt that I had more than met the challenge. Satisfied,

Square Grid Wreaths Tessellation Reverse Engineer

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 This is a straight up reverse engineer of a model I saw on Instagram. The fold was by origamitraces. The design was by origami.by.e I believe the title was multiple wreaths.  Theirs was arranged a little differently. I used a 32 pleat square grid and went to the effort to center mine so all the margins were even.  I don't do a lot of square grid tessellations. They feel much simpler than the hexagonal sort.  But I'm quite pleased with this one. I was able to execute it using some neon paper I'd selected specifically for tessellating.  I wasn't sure the paper would do what I was hoping it would, but was pleasantly surprised.  Figuring it out was pretty straight forward.  Collapsing it was pleasantly easy.  There's nothing more satisfying than a simple tessellation that yields a complex result. This is a prime example of that. 

Jewel Weave Origami Tessellation

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I saw a similar fold to this one on flickr and it reminded me of a tessellation I created some years ago. That one used the same shapes as this, but at half the size. It didn't come out that great as it was a small and tightly packed fold. So I had intended to revisit it someday. This one is a larger proportioned version of that. Thanks to the larger shapes it is much easier to execute neatly, but it still has a decent repeat on a 32 pleat grid.  The original idea used small hex twists. This one uses open back hex twists.  Very poorly drawn crease pattern included below. 

More Triangle Twist Fun

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This is another tessellation out of Migeul Ganan's 'Twist and Tess' book.  I used his main module as the central point, but I arranged everything much closer together.  I mostly work with a 32 pleat triangle grid, so it's essential to keep things close if you want any repetition.  The back sides of his triangle twist based tesses are really quite interesting. I love how they back light. They are pretty fuss free folds. Just a matter of folding the triangle twists in a certain configuration.  The nice thing about an all triangle twist based tessellation is that you don't need to pre-crease. You can just fold them on the fly.  They come together quickly and you have a really nice finished product. 

Dancing Boxes Tessellation

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 This tessellation is comprised of rectangles twisted around large hexagons. On the reverse side there are some possible triangles. I opted not to flatten them.  I toyed with the flattening, but wasn't into it.  I think not flattening it rendered a nicer finished product.  For some reason I have a particular penchant for using rectangles in origami tessellations. I couldn't say why. 

Criss Cross Origami Tessellation

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 Was fiddling around with a triangle twist as the central point. Added some arms to that. Then just repeated.  I quite like the look of the larger triangle shape.  I considered having them not overlap, but ultimately was curious to see how this configuration would play out in the end.  Designs like this always keep me interested because you can arrange the overlaps in different ways to come up with numerous variations.  Generally speaking, it's a pretty basic pattern, but I find it interesting all the same. 

Ganan's Intricate Triangle Twists

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  Folded another tessellation from Miguel Ganan's book 'Twist and Tess'. While the central module was simple enough to bang out pretty easily, I did fumble a little with folding the repetitions.  Nevertheless, it did come together.  My spacing is a little closer together, but I think everything else is the same.  Back in my early days of learning tessellation I did many triangle twist based designs. Still, I don't remember them ever rendering such intricate patterns as his do.  It really makes me wonder what other configurations are out there that I've not realized.  All these years later, I still have so much to learn. 

The Other Side of Tessellations

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  I got the basis for this tessellation out of Migel Ganan's book 'Twist and Tesss'.  I used his main module idea, but I changed it up a little bit.  Maybe it's just me, but I kinda feel like a lot of triangle twist based tessellations have a more interesting reverse side than their fronts. So the first pic is what he envisioned as the back.  The way the reverse sides of some of his tessellations backlight remind me a lot of the ideas of Arseniy K . He has lots of beautiful origami tessellations on his instagram. He's a brilliant paper artist.   It's almost as if these two designers see the shapes from completely opposite perspectives. Me, I just mostly fold. Sometimes figure out. And occasionally  have a unique idea.  Mostly, I'm just glad to be a part of it all. 

Pawns and Queens Origami Tessellation

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  A post I saw on Instagram caught my eye. Don't remember to whom it belonged. I'm a little obsessed with figuring out how to fold tessellations I find on there. It's a great way to learn.  I didn't realize it at first, but this one was incredibly similar to the idea I had executed in the previous post.  I suppose every origami tessellation is essentially a variation on a few basic fundamental principles. There are a handful of ways to fold things on a triangle grid. There are a limited number of shapes to be extracted. And there are only so many ways they can be neatly combined.  The creativity comes in with how to distribute and arrange all these choices.  At any rate, I just straight up folded the pic I found. Although, I did have to make the proportions larger.  Some people are great at doing these tiny, micro folds, but I am not. My paper isn't up to the task and my fingers are just too short and stubby..  It's a wonder I can tessellate at all with these ch