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Pawns and Queens Origami Tessellation

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  A post I saw on Instagram caught my eye. Don't remember to whom it belonged. I'm a little obsessed with figuring out how to fold tessellations I find on there. It's a great way to learn.  I didn't realize it at first, but this one was incredibly similar to the idea I had executed in the previous post.  I suppose every origami tessellation is essentially a variation on a few basic fundamental principles. There are a handful of ways to fold things on a triangle grid. There are a limited number of shapes to be extracted. And there are only so many ways they can be neatly combined.  The creativity comes in with how to distribute and arrange all these choices.  At any rate, I just straight up folded the pic I found. Although, I did have to make the proportions larger.  Some people are great at doing these tiny, micro folds, but I am not. My paper isn't up to the task and my fingers are just too short and stubby..  It's a wonder I can tessellate at all with these ch

Butterflies Origami Tessellation

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 Inspired by the (new to me) concept of rotated grids, I came up with a configuration which seemed to work on paper.  It also worked in a small tester fold.  It worked on a larger scale as well, just barely. It's a tight fit, but it can be convinced.  It starts with rotated open back hexagons on the rear.  On the front side there are these odd propeller shapes. They are similar to the shapes in some other designs, but a little different.  It's tricky to get the quads to of those shapes to come together neatly, but it can be done. 

Grinning Triangles Origami Tessellation

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  This is an idea I had very suddenly and pretty much out of nowhere. It's probably been done many times before, but I had not previously come across it.  It's hexagons and two sizes of triangles. I actually began by just placing the two sizes of triangles in groups and realized the hexagons were needed.  The hexagons and small triangles are on one side and the large triangles are on the other.  Instead of twists, it employs that technique of folding a small hexagon in on itself to create a triangle on the opposite side.  It was not too difficult to fold.  A lot of prep work was involved before the actual collapsing is ready to happen.  Ordinary paper held up pretty nicely during the process. 

Daniel Kwan's Accidental Pseudo-Flagstone

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 I've fallen out of practice with square grid tessellations. Used to do them all the time not too many years ago. The clover tess. The high density clover tessellation. Hydrangea. High density hydrangea. Recursive stuff. And many more.  But when I started to get into triangle grid flagstone folds I became pretty obsessed. So other types became somewhat neglected.  I found the crease pattern for this on Daniel Kwan's flickr page. I could tell to look at it that it would probably be intense. But in many ways that just made it all the more enticing to attempt.   I did a large 16 division grid trial fold at first, to try to better understand it. That turned out to be a good idea.  When I went to fold the 32 division version I already had a pretty good understanding of what should be happening on both the front and the back of the paper.  I used the sturdiest paper I had at my disposal, which was kraft paper.  I figured anything weaker would not survive the process.  It was still a

Kaleidoscope Origami Tessellation

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 I was messing around with Miguel Ganan's crease pattern for what he calls 'A ring to rule them all'. Nice Lord of the Rings reference.  Removed some stuff. Re-oriented a bit. This is the end result.  I can't publish the crease pattern. His is a part of a recently published book and mine is probably too similar.  Suffice it to say, there are a lot of triangle twists happening.  It's a pretty easy fold. Mildly tricky at times.  Collapse the third size hexagon onto the second. Do some twists off of that that. Tuck under the flaps. That's the gist of it. 

Gjerde's Negative Space Stars Variation

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  Decided to fold Eric Gjerde's 'Negative Space Stars'. Even though I've done most of the designs in his book, this is one I had not.  Way back when I was first learning from his book, even after most of the structures and methods began to coalesce for me, this one still felt difficult.  Today, it's fun and easy.  Not to take anything away from his design. It's really interesting and not something I would ever come up with on my own. I love his ideas and his book. It just blows my mind how many levels there are to the simple act of folding a single sheet of paper.  It's amazing.  I unintentionally altered it some. Wasn't paying close attention to the valley and mountain folds in the crease pattern. Didn't have a pic of the original finished model. I put my hexagons and rectangles on the back side. I put the big triangle points on the front.  Small changes, unique results.  I guess to fold it the way he intended is still on my to do list after all.  :

Lens Stars Origami Tessellation Reverse Engineer

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  I've gotten into Instagram lately. So many origami tessellators are on there. It's a great place to find ideas and inspiration.  My latest fold is courtesy of that community. I saw someone else's fold of this and decided to see if I could figure it out.  @cmorigami had uploaded their reverse enginneer of a fold by @gatheringfolds. A little tricky to determine, but nothing crazy.  A little tricky to fold as well, but again, nothing really frustrating.  I think I've done some similar designs in the past the used the same triad config of rhombuses rotating around a triangle.  Apparently it falls under the sub-genre of rotated grids. This term was new to me.  It's a really interesting configuration. It doesn't seem to have a definitive creator. Apparently several people have come up with it on their own.  It was a fun design to map out  and execute.  Crease pattern is below. 

Right Triangles Origami Tessellation

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 I found a crease pattern by Daniel Kwan that I was interested in folding. I don't remember what he called it. Update: He called it Triangle Tessellation 2. Tried to look for it again, but I couldn't find it the second time around. Update: I found it on happyfolding.com via a link in instagram.  Then happyfolding had a link to the original crease pattern at his flickr.  It didn't look difficult, but it actually was quite intense.  I missed the warning at happyfolding that said how hard it was. . My first attempt failed So I decided to modify it to make it a little larger and therefore somewhat easier to execute. It was still really hard. Maybe my cheap paper is partially to blame.  But I was able to complete my modified version.  His used small offset hexagons. I just bumped it up to regular open back hexagons. There are right triangles off of the hexes and rectangles bridge the gaps. Some triangles are also a part of the equation on the backside..  I think I have a creas

Triangles Made of Triangles Tess

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 I recently acquired Michel Ganan's book 'Tessellations and More'. I went in knowing it probably wasn't likely to teach me anything new, but that it might showcase ideas I hadn't thought of or otherwise seen.  He did some triangle twist configurations that I thought were really interesting. This gave me the idea for triangles made up of triangles. Why not? Right.  Pretty basic. Just triangle twists arranged in a specific pattern. But it produces a really nice looking finished product.  Super easy to fold. I didn't even pre-crease the triangles. I just used the spread squash technique. 

Triangle Triads

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I think I've seen this idea around in various forms. Maybe not this exact configuration.  It's a triangle twist with wide wings off of it. It tessellates naturally in three directions, because it's triangular.  In order to fill in the gaps and have it flatten, I made the wings wider in the other three spaces.  It was hard to get a nice photos of it. I don't know why.  Zoom in on the backlit. It's pretty neat.  Had a crease pattern drawn. Lost it. Might draw another and add it.  But it shouldn't be hard to figure. Especially from the non-backlit picture.. It's an interesting little exercise. A little tricky. Nothing crazy.

Flowing Stones Origami Tessellation

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 This is an idea I had a while back, but it felt a little simple. Because of the weather (humid = soft paper), I decided to just go ahead and bang it out and finally see how it would look finished.  It was a pretty easy fold. Nothing tricky about it.  It's a 3D fold. It does not flatten.  Crease pattern is super easy. Just that odd shape with triangles poking at the cross grid folds.  These kinds of ideas are prefect for weak paper and humid days. They really respond well to those circumstances.  But I'm eager for autumn and some crisp, dry days where complex folds are again feasible. I'd much rather fold something difficult, even if it's someone else's idea. 

Figured Out, But Haven't Quite Folded

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So I found this pic I had saved a while back that really piqued my interest. It was folded by Origami Yonca and designed by Aresniy K. Those two really keep me busy with the origami solving.  It wasn't too difficult to figure out the creases, however, actually folding it was a very different experience.  First attempt was a fail. I used sturdy paper, but it was too humid. The paper went limp. Second attempt, I used barely okay paper, but I'm nearly there. Still working on some of the finer details.  I think size really is an issue. I'm using printer paper. So the folds tend to be very small.  I'm pretty sure if I went back to thick paper on a dry day it would turn out really nice. Just not sure that I want to make a third attempt. I'm pretty sure I can complete the second, even if it might have a few flaws.  I did sort of complete the second attempt. It's somewhat flawed. However, I realized that I had folded it on paper that for reasons I can't really discl

Kissing Stones Origami Tessellation

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Something a little less intense. Double size hexagons with triangles off the points.  Blunt pyramids off of the triangles.  It's not wildly difficult or immensely intricate, but it was a fun little exercise.  It's a flat fold on a 32 pleat triangle grid.  Done on an ordinary 8.5 x 11 inch sheet of copy paper trimmed to a hexagon. .  You don't have to trim out the paper to a hexagon. It can be done just the same on the rectangle. I just find it's easier to reach the center with my stubby little fingers.  Other than the initial hexagon, No cuts. No buts. No coconuts. 

Framing It Origami Tessellation

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I had come up with the crease pattern for a really cool tessellation that I'd saved to my google photos. It's quite intricate. The figuring part was actually easier than I expected. The folding part was a little more intense. I got to a point where I just had to take a step back. It was partially coalescing, but not quite.  It has a lot of fiddly little folds that need to happen for it to work. And I was just kind of over it.  I was glad to have figured it out from the picture of the model, but not really sure if I could actually fold it with the size of paper I was using. It was set aside for another day. Though, it still felt like a win, since I did have the mechanics all worked out on paper.  Moving on, taking a break from the hard stuff, I came up with something simpler just off the top of my head. An easy one was a welcome distraction.  It's pretty basic, but an interesting pattern still.  I forgot to take a pic of the crease pattern. Will upload it at a later date.

Bridged Triangle Vortexes Tessellation

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 The classic six triangles twisted around a small hexagon on the reverse is a cornerstone of tessellating paper. In this case, I just added a little rectangle and then repeated the six triangle module. Some blunt cornered triangles form in the negative space.  Whenever I fold this type of tessellation I'm always reminded of Robin Scholz's videos where he effortlessly folds the same type of configuration piece by piece.  The paper always seems to behave exactly as he wants.  As much as I try to do it that way, it never works. I always end up with a completed center that starts to come undone as I work outward. I wind up partially folding the rest and then pushing it altogether as a whole. .  Nevertheless, regardless of the method, I'm still pretty pleased with the end result. 

Solving Arseniy K's Crows Having Fun Origami Tessellation

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 Still deep into my fascination with Arseniy K's tessellations, I set about reconstructing his "Crows Having Fun" model.  A few  false starts later, it coalesced for me and I had the crease pattern ready to fold.  It was a nice fold. It wasn't too hard. It wasn't too easy. It was just right. It fits perfectly on a 32 pleat triangle grid.  Those odd little beak shapes circle around large hexagons. Triangles negotiate the spaces where their edges meet.  The negative space triangles on the front are blunt cornered triangles on the reverse.  It was actually knowing what shape would create the negative triangles on the front that led me to the solution. I started from there and worked outward on grid paper It's a wonderful and unique design.   Crease pattern included below. 

Chain-link Origami Tessellation

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Was working on figuring out another design on Arseniy K's instagram when I stumbled upon this alternative crease pattern. I knew it was not the answer to the puzzle I was trying to solve, but I liked it. So I forged ahead with it.  It turned out quite nice.  Slightly tricky to fold. Very crowded on the reverse side. Lots of overlaps.  I did later hit upon the structure for his actual model and have since folded that as well. It will be my next post.  It's neat though, how the process of figuring out another fold led me to this unique variation.  Crease pattern is included below. 

Stepping Stones Tessellation

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  I'm a big fan of Arseniy K's origami tessellations. I often check out his stuff for both reverse engineer challenges and inspirations for new designs.  I was poking around on his instagram and really liked a piece that featured a trio of nested small triangles. He titled it "Crushed Ice for Cocktails".  Figuring out the pattern wasn't too bad. However, when I went to fold it, all I achieved was a really limp, sad piece of paper that was never going to do what I had intended.  It's a very dense and complicated crease pattern which I may attempt again sometime with sturdier paper.  But since I already had the structure figured out, I decided to modify it a bit to make it a somewhat less intense undertaking.  This tessellation is the result of that.  It's a three dimensional fold.  I thought about literally doubling everything for a flat fold, but I opted against it since it would have so little repeat on a 32 division grid. Side note: I really need to acqu